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Civil Rights in New York CityFrom World War II to the Giuliani Era$
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Clarence Taylor

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823232895

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823232895.001.0001

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Racial Events, Diplomacy, and Dinkins's Image

Racial Events, Diplomacy, and Dinkins's Image

Chapter:
(p.182) 9 Racial Events, Diplomacy, and Dinkins's Image
Source:
Civil Rights in New York City
Author(s):

Clarence Taylor

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823232895.003.0010

New York City is a political environment replete with socially isolated ethnic groups. This is how the Chinese met whites and how Jews met blacks. Usually the buyer and seller enjoy a limited and peaceful transaction, but occasionally there is a misunderstanding that leads to conflict. The premise of David Dinkins's mayoral campaign was that the city needed a mayor who could resolve these recurrent racial/ethnic conflicts. The Bensonhurst and Howard Beach incidents had convinced many New Yorkers that the racial situation was getting out of hand. Dinkins portrayed himself as the man who could create a political environment in which such conflicts would be unlikely and as a man who could anticipate these racial incidents before they occurred and resolve them once they did.

Keywords:   David Dinkins, racial conflicts, ethnic conflicts, Bensonhurst, Howard Beach, mayoral campaign

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