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Poetics of EmptinessTransformations of Asian Thought in American Poetry$
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Jonathan Stalling

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780823231447

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823231447.001.0001

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/ Patterned Harmony: Buddhism, Sound, and Ernest Fenollosa's Poetics of Correlative Cosmology

/ Patterned Harmony: Buddhism, Sound, and Ernest Fenollosa's Poetics of Correlative Cosmology

Chapter:
(p.59) 2 / Patterned Harmony: Buddhism, Sound, and Ernest Fenollosa's Poetics of Correlative Cosmology
Source:
Poetics of Emptiness
Author(s):

Jonathan Stalling

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823231447.003.0004

This chapter looks into distinct set of cultural engagements within Fenollosa's transpacific imaginary, which surface in the lost half of Fenollosa's “The Chinese Written Character as a Medium for Poetry.” When Ezra Pound published Fenollosa's short essay in 1936, he revised and published only one half of Fenollosa's original essay. The second half deals largely with the sounds of Chinese formal prosody and theories of how to translate and transliterate these sounds into English poetry. This finding is important because critics have long censured Fenollosa for his choice to ignore sound in his discussion of Chinese poetry. This chapter, therefore, explores Fenollosa's ideas of Chinese prosody and, by extension, examines how his theories of translation and transliteration extend from his understanding and triangulation of Western Romanticism, traditional Chinese philosophy, poetics, and his Japanese Buddhist investments (the elements of Fenollosa's hybrid Hegelian Tendai Buddhism).

Keywords:   Chinese formal prosody, English poetry, Chinese poetry, Western Romanticism, Japanese Buddhist investments

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