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The Rhetoric of TerrorReflections on 9/11 and the War on Terror$
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Marc Redfield

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780823231232

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823231232.001.0001

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. Romanticism and the War on Terror

. Romanticism and the War on Terror

Chapter:
5. Romanticism and the War on Terror
Source:
The Rhetoric of Terror
Author(s):

Marc Redfield

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823231232.003.0012

Burke as a counterrevolutionary writer has produced many writings about the French Revolution and the opening era of human rights. There has been a tradition of reading that Burke is the father or fount of modern conservatism and as a self-divided figure and covertly akin to sympathy with the revolutionary. Reflection reveals Burke repeating what he condemns and his worries about the status of the borders that he cannot help systematically. His writing in the great political philosophical tradition that descends from Aristotle through Hobbes produces a social-contract justification of governmental authority. At other times Burke, whose references to traditional religious faith never come across as very deeply felt, offers a more secular account of society's origins. Burke's writing in 1970 becomes prominent above all in the Letters on a Regicide Peace because he insists that the war on terror must be a total war, fought without remission or mercy.

Keywords:   war on terror, Romanticism, Burke, conservatism, counterrevolutionary, French Revolution, terror, human rights

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