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Reading the Allegorical IntertextChaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton$
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Judith H. Anderson

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780823228478

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823228478.001.0001

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Androcentrism and Acrasian Fantasies in the Bower of Bliss

Androcentrism and Acrasian Fantasies in the Bower of Bliss

Chapter:
(p.224) 15. Androcentrism and Acrasian Fantasies in the Bower of Bliss
Source:
Reading the Allegorical Intertext
Author(s):

Judith H. Anderson

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823228478.003.0017

Harry Berger's “Wring out the Old: Squeezing the Text, 1951–2001” will be a major critique on the Bower of Bliss for years to come and Bower needs to engage its tightly argued analysis of the structural discourse. Berger exposes the working of misogyny as a target of the Bower, and he keeps on insisting that the Bower is tautologically misogynist. Traditions of misogyny are pretty various when factoring in various genres and languages. As Berger put this tradition to Bower, he caused Bower to vanish as a mimetic topos which ensures its continuing power over the mind as a literary topos. Because of the importance of the Bower and Berger's essay to any reading of the The Faerie Queene, some questions are raised in accord with Berger's own critical approach to others' readings.

Keywords:   Harry Berger, androcentrism, misogyny, Bower of Bliss, The Faerie Queene

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