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Legacies of Paul de Man$
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Marc Redfield

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780823227600

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823227600.001.0001

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Thinking Singularity With Immanuel Kant and Paul De Man: Aesthetics, Epistemology, History, and Politics

Thinking Singularity With Immanuel Kant and Paul De Man: Aesthetics, Epistemology, History, and Politics

Chapter:
(p.129) Thinking Singularity With Immanuel Kant and Paul De Man: Aesthetics, Epistemology, History, and Politics
Source:
Legacies of Paul de Man
Author(s):

Marc Redfield

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823227600.003.0008

While emerging from Kant's analysis of aesthetics, this conceptuality entails a radical form of epistemology and, correlatively, a radical form of historicity. This conceptual and epistemological configuration, however also translates into a political concept of community or, as I shall call it here, “parliamentary”. The genealogy of the conceptuality and epistemology in question may itself be in part political, insofar as the actual practice of politics may have served, deliberately or not, as one of the models of this epistemology. For Kant's purposes, then, “a material vision” is the very opposite of the “phenomenalized, empirically manifest principle of cognition” that the aesthetic was supposed to provide; material vision is the Dantean hell that de Man invents for Kant as a parody of Kant's desire for “phenomenal cognition.”

Keywords:   entails, historicity, epistemology, parody, phenomenalized

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