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Dante and the Origins of Italian Literary Culture$
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Teodolinda Barolini

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780823227037

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823227037.001.0001

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Notes Toward a Gendered History of Italian Literature, with a Discussion of Dante's Beatrix Loquax

Notes Toward a Gendered History of Italian Literature, with a Discussion of Dante's Beatrix Loquax

Chapter:
(p.360) Chapter 16 Notes Toward a Gendered History of Italian Literature, with a Discussion of Dante's Beatrix Loquax
Source:
Dante and the Origins of Italian Literary Culture
Author(s):

Teodolinda Barolini

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823227037.003.0017

The dialectic between courtly and anti-courtly ideologies is a historical constant in the early Italian tradition: it is present not only in Dante, but in poets before Dante, like Guittone d'Arezzo, and it is a major feature of Boccaccio's work as well. For this reason, the ideological shifts manifested by these authors lend themselves to the construction of a historical overview of gender in this tradition, allowing us to frame a gendered history of early Italian literature in terms of the dialectic between a courtly ideology and a competing set of values. Courtliness, the set of values associated with what Dante and his peers call cortesia, is by definition a gendered issue, since its logic is constructed around a male/female binary.

Keywords:   Dante, Guittone d'Arezzo, Boccaccio, gender, courtliness, cortesia, Italian literature, ideologies

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