Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Dante and the Origins of Italian Literary Culture$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Teodolinda Barolini

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780823227037

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823227037.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 October 2017

Sotto benda: Gender in the Lyrics of Dante and Guittone d'Arezzo (With a Brief Excursus on Cecco D'Ascoli)

Sotto benda: Gender in the Lyrics of Dante and Guittone d'Arezzo (With a Brief Excursus on Cecco D'Ascoli)

Chapter:
(p.333) Chapter 15 Sotto benda: Gender in the Lyrics of Dante and Guittone d'Arezzo (With a Brief Excursus on Cecco D'Ascoli)
Source:
Dante and the Origins of Italian Literary Culture
Author(s):

Teodolinda Barolini

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823227037.003.0016

Dante's poetic apprenticeship, both formal and ideological, occurred while he was a writer of lyric poems. The ninety or so lyrics that Dante wrote harbor the wellsprings of his ideological convictions with the result that we must turn to these poems to analyze the paths that Dante took to becoming the poet of the Commedia. The lyrics contain implicit and at times explicit debates on cultural and societal issues of great immediacy for Dante's mercantile audience: issues such as the nature of chivalry and nobility, the desire for wealth and its relationship to avarice, the limits and constraints of political loyalty, and—intertwined with everything else—the role of women and implicitly the construction of gender.

Keywords:   Dante, lyrics, nobility, wealth, avarice, loyalty, Commedia, chivalry, gender

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .