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Manhood, Marriage, and MischiefRembrandt's 'Night Watch' and Other Dutch Group Portraits$
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Harry Berger

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780823225569

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823225569.001.0001

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Captain Cocq and the Unruly Musketeer

Captain Cocq and the Unruly Musketeer

Chapter:
(p.185) 14 Captain Cocq and the Unruly Musketeer
Source:
Manhood, Marriage, and Mischief
Author(s):

Harry Berger Jr.

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823225569.003.0015

The embodiment of Klovenier order and discipline is “the dignified musketeer” partly visible between the captain and lieutenant: his effort “to redirect the line of fire” gets converted to a symbol of “the reasoned and artful manipulation of the weapon by the Kloveniers.” The unruly shooter is young; the red musketeer loading his weapon is in the prime of life; the one blowing powder from the firing pan is old. Although Captain Cocq has an impressive career profile, latter-day commentators occasionally express doubts about the man depicted in these verbal and visual sources. Kenneth Clark's assertion that Banning Cocq “remained proud of his act of patronage” is qualified by the judgment that precedes it: the captain's “pink, inarticulate face does not suggest a high degree of intelligence.”

Keywords:   Klovenier, musketeer, shooter, red, Captain Cocq, Kenneth Clark, patronage

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